Argyle Brook and Logans Glen Falls

The photos on this page are of Argyle Brook and Logans Glen Falls. Very similar to MacPhersons Brook along the Lewis Mountain Trail, which I discovered in 2011, and equally little known, Argyle Brook is a lovely, active brook that runs alongside Logans Glen Road, with lots of rapids, miniature falls, and cascades making it sing merrily as it descends the valley it has carved. The photos on this page were taken on my return hike from the MacLeod homestead and thus proceed from higher up the mountain to the base of the mountain.

Argyle Brook
[#1] Photo 293 of 464: Argyle Brook
ISO 200   50 mm   ƒ⁄5   1⁄15 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
1.3 km (⅘ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.434′N 61°02.640′W

Photo #1 is a view of Argyle Brook from about ⅗ of the way to the MacLeod homestead. As can be seen, the waters of the brook were moving right along.

Photo #2 is another view about half way to the MacLeod homestead. This is a slightly more placid stretch, though the waters were moving along right well. The depth does not appear to be very great; there’s a natural fording spot above the centre of the photo.

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Argyle Brook
[#2] Photo 294 of 464: Argyle Brook
ISO 200   52 mm   ƒ⁄5   1⁄50 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
925 m (⅗ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.258′N 61°02.489′W
Argyle Brook
[#3] Photo 295 of 464: Argyle Brook
ISO 800   58 mm   ƒ⁄5   1⁄125 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
695 m (⅖ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.171′N 61°02.360′W

Photo #3 was taken from about a third of the way to the MacLeod homestead. This is another placid stretch. Logans Glen Road is at the left above but close by the brook. The sun, seen on the trees at the curve in the distance did not penetrate the canopy much here.

Photo #4, taken at the same point as photo #3, looks upstream at a very small dual cascade that was making a merry sound. It was a great joy to hear this brook’s beautiful song all along the road during the hike.

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A small dual cascade on Argyle Brook
[#4] Photo 296 of 464: A small dual cascade on Argyle Brook
ISO 400   68 mm   ƒ⁄5.3   1⁄50 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
695 km (431⅚ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.170′N 61°02.354′W
Logans Glen Falls
[#5] Photo 297 of 464: Logans Glen Falls
ISO 800   75 mm   ƒ⁄5.3   1⁄250 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
360 m (⅕ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.035′N 61°02.204′W

Photo #5 is a nearly side-on view of Logans Glen Falls. It is very different from the photo at the top of the Nova Scotia Waterfalls page: it took me some time to realize that this initial photo is common to all the waterfall descriptions on the site and has nothing to do with Logans Glen Falls in particular. It was that photo that was in my mind when I was looking for the falls after parking the car. The subsequent photos below it are of Logans Glen Falls, though from a different perspective than this one and, from their variety, show that the falls take on several different aspects depending on the water flow and the season.

Photo #6 is a second view of the falls, also nearly side-on. According to the Nova Scotia Waterfalls page, the falls are 6 m (20 ft) in height; that site also notes that “These charming twin falls drop nearly identical cascades a few meters from each other, splitting around an outcropping and rejoining as one flow below the falls. The left hand side fall has, in recent years, been quite dry, standing out in stark contrast to the beautiful fall on the right hand side.” While the further fall was not dry, its flow was indeed significantly less this day.

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Logans Glen Falls
[#6] Photo 298 of 464: Logans Glen Falls
ISO 800   68 mm   ƒ⁄5.3   1⁄125 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
360 m (⅕ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.035′N 61°02.205′W
The lower cascade on the right side of Logans Glen Falls
[#7] Photo 299 of 464: The lower cascade on the right side of Logans Glen Falls
ISO 800   105 mm   ƒ⁄5.6   1⁄320 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
360 m (⅕ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.035′N 61°02.202′W

Photo #7 is a telephoto view of the lower portion of the cascade on the right side of Logans Glen Falls. It is receiving a little of the flow of the left cascade from the upper left, but the major portion is from the right cascade, which was exploding as it hit obstructions on its way down.

Photo #8 shows a much smaller cascade below Logans Glen Falls, perhaps 1.2 m (4 ft) in height. It sits beside a huge boulder whose right side the waters appear to have worn away.

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A smaller cascade below Logans Glen Falls
[#8] Photo 300 of 464: A smaller cascade below Logans Glen Falls
ISO 800   40 mm   ƒ⁄5   1⁄100 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
285 m (⅙ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.006′N 61°02.159′W
An inuksuk on Argyle Brook
[#9] Photo 301 of 464: An inuksuk on Argyle Brook
ISO 800   18 mm   ƒ⁄5   1⁄100 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
285 m (⅙ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.005′N 61°02.160′W

Photo #9 shows a fine inuksuk someone has constructed on the boulders of Argyle Brook below Logans Glen Falls. I particularly like the Scottish tam with toorie (pompom) on the top! These impromptu stone assemblages, constructed by hikers, often bear some passing resemblance to human figures, but in Cape Breton, at least, have little more significance than to leave a lasting memento of a visit for the enjoyment of those who arrive afterwards. For considerably more information about the origin and significance of inuksuit (the irregular plural of inuksuk) to the Arctic first nations as well as several photos and other pertinent discussion, visit this very interesting Wikipedia page.

Photo #10 shows another lovely small cascade below Logans Glen Falls in the same area as the inuksuk of photo #9. I find the sound of running water over rocks especially enchanting!

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Another small cascade below Logans Glen Falls
[#10] Photo 302 of 464: Another small cascade below Logans Glen Falls
ISO 800   42 mm   ƒ⁄5   1⁄125 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
285 m (⅙ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.005′N 61°02.149′W
A beautiful multiple cascade below Logans Glen Falls
[#11] Photo 303 of 464: A beautiful multiple cascade below Logans Glen Falls
ISO 800   105 mm   ƒ⁄5.6   1⁄200 sec
Taken 2013 July 10 in North Side Whycocomagh Bay from the Logans Glen Road
280 m (⅙ mi) from its start on the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 105)
GPS 45°59.001′N 61°02.161′W

I conclude this page with photo #11, showing another lovely multiple cascade below Logans Glen Falls. What a beautiful spot this turned out to be! The many photos I took of the brook and the glen have certainly brought back to mind the wonderful hours I spent there; it has been a joy reliving that day as I wrote these two pages. It is sad that this spot is not better known: before I stumbled across the Nova Scotia Waterfalls web page, I had heard nothing at all about it. It is an easily accessible spot, once one finds Logans Glen Road, and the scene in the last photo is but 115 m (380 ft) from where I parked the car (Logans Glen Falls itself is only 75 m (250 ft) further up the road). Give it a visit!